Totteridge & Whetstone

INTRODUCTION

This post is about a minor station which is local to very different places of interest for me.

THE HISTORY

Like the rest of the Northern line beyond Highgate on the High Barnet branch, Totteridge & Whetstone is a comparative late comer, having been first served in 1940. However, its origins, on a branch of the London and North Eastern Railway make it one of the older stations to feature on the network, as it opened for business in that guise as long ago as 1872. Incidentally, the expansion at the northern end of the Northern line at this time was nearly even more dramatic, as the third of the three map pictures with which i conclude this section shows…

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WALSINGHAM SUPPORT 

Walsingham Support is an organisation that supports people with disabilities. I came across them because someone from there put an excellent contribution to #autismawareness on twitter, which, combined with their address was responsible for the genesis of this post. Here is a map showing their relevance to a post focussing on Totteridge & Whetstone:

Directions from Totteridge & Whetstone to Walsingham Support courtesy of google maps.
Directions from Totteridge & Whetstone to Walsingham Support courtesy of google maps.

For the full map and written instructions about the route click here.

DOLLIS VALLEY GREENWALK

It is no secret that I am an ardent advocate of walking, so when I spotted the proximity of the Dollis Valley Greenwalk to the station I was covering it was natural to do some digging, and I first located the Barnet Council web page on the subject, which led me to a guide which is downloadable as a PDF – I urge you to do this and read it in full.

Totteridge & Whetstone

 

Manor House

INTRODUCTION

This is a post that owes its existence to serendipity – a piece of imaging at work yesterday and something I saw on twitter yesterday combining to give me the idea.

THE HISTORY

Manor House was opened as part of the first northerly extension of the Piccadilly line in 1932 (the extension from Finsbury Park to Cockfosters happened in three phases during 1932-3). It has had the same name for its whole history, although later in this post I will be suggesting a change. Here are two maps to show its history and modern connections:

The history.
The history.

 

Modern connections.
Modern connections.

AN EXCITING DEVELOPMENT AND A SUGGESTED NAME CHANGE

While on twitter I spotted a tweet about a development called Woodberry Wetlands and being impressed by what I saw decided to do some digging. I soon established that the site is practically next door to Manor House station, and it did not take much longer, having located an official website to decide that this was something entirely worthy of my support – cherishing nature while being deep within the capital city. For those who (like me) do twitter, they have a presence there too.

I have a number of pictures for you, some gleaned with the help of google maps, and some extracted from the official website (individual URLs accompany each of these pics)…

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One way for a public transport user to take in this attraction once it is opened without retracing their steps – travel to Manor House, and back from Stamford Hill.

Woodberry Wetlands 1 Woodberry Wetlands 2 Woodberry Wetlands 3

http://www.woodberrywetlands.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/Z7W1269-1140x550.jpg
http://www.woodberrywetlands.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/Z7W1269-1140×550.jpg
http://www.woodberrywetlands.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/Z7W0419-2-1140x550.jpg
http://www.woodberrywetlands.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/Z7W0419-2-1140×550.jpg
http://www.woodberrywetlands.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/Z7W6087-1140x550.jpg
http://www.woodberrywetlands.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/Z7W6087-1140×550.jpg

Woodberry Wetlands opens on May 1st 2016, and I wish them all the best. I finish this section with…

A SUGGESTED NAME CHANGE

There is historical precedence for name changes on the Piccadiilly line – the name of Gillespie Road station was changed to Arsenal at the request of the club’s then general manager Herbert Chapman. I respectfully suggest that this project outweighs a mere football club in importance and that TFL would be well advised to at least consider changing the name of Manor House station to Woodberry Wetlands (effective from May 1st).

A LOST HOSPITAL

Lot 681 in James and Sons’ April auction is the following…

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This led me to look up Manor House Hospital, and I found this listing which I urge you to check for further details.

 

 

London Bridge

INTRODUCTION

This post features a hub station which is also close to numerous attractions.

THE HISTORY

Like all of London’s major railway stations this one has its origins in the mid 19th century. This map shows London Bridge and its connections in 1897…

This is an extract focussing on London Bridge.
This is an extract focussing on London Bridge.
This is the full map.
This is the full map.

In 1900 The City & South London Railway, the world’s first deep level ‘tube’ railway abandoned its badly sited King William Street terminus and opened three new stations at its northern end, London Bridge, Bank and Moorgate (for more about the subsequent history of this railway and what it became click here. In 1999, delayed and warped out of recognition by the greed and vanity of successive governments, the Jubilee line opened its long-awaited extension, one of the new stations on which was London Bridge. London Bridge was until recently part of the Thameslink route but is no longer so. These days there is an interchange available to Transport for London’s Riverboat Service as well. 

TWO ATTRACTIONS

There are two major attractions served by London Bridge. HMS Belfast is a historic warship, which for many years has been a floating museum (I visited several times as a child) and is now run under the aegis of the Imperial War Museum. The second attraction is the London Dungeon, which occupies what was once the notorious Clink Street Prison (from which the phrase ‘in the clink’ for ‘in prison’ comes) and styles itself London’s most frightening place.

RIVERSIDE WALKING

London Bridge is ideally placed as a starting and/or finishing point for walks along the Thames. Westward as far as Waterloo is all good walking, while eastward lie Maritime Greenwich and, for the seriously energetic, Woolwich. This, from 100 Walks in Greater London, is a recommneded walk featuring some of what I have just mentioned…

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Note that the Museum of the Moving Image has closed down since this book was produced.

AN AUCTION LOT

This, conveniently tallying with the theme of this post, is lot 604 in James and Sons‘ March Auction (two day sale, 30th and 31st March at Fakenham Racecourse – this item will be going under the hammer early in the second day)…

604

A FEW MAPS

I conclude this post with two map pictures, one from the Diagrammatic History and one from a modern London Connections Map…

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