An Antique Map That Ties in With the Site

INTRODUCTION

This is the second of two posts I am producing about items I purchased at yesterday’s auction. This one has a slihglty more tenuous connection to the subject matter of this website than the badge, but an examination of my posts about the Metropolitan and Central lines will make clear the relevance of a map of Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire.

FROM 5 NORWICH STREET, FAKENHAM TO 117E HIGH STREET, KING’S LYNN

Number 5, Norwich Street, Fakenham is the address of James and Sons auctioneers, for whom I work, among other things imaging auction lots, while 117E High Street, King’s Lynn is the address of the ‘compact’ town centre flat in which I reside. As so often, my first sight of this addition to my collection was while imaging it for the auction at which I subsequently acquired it.

The image that everyone saw.
The image that everyone saw.

What this image does not convey is the very solid backing that this map has, which helps to explain how it is survived for nigh on a century.

I duly put a bid in in hope more than expectation (I was determined to get the badge and delighted when my bid proved sufficient to land this as well).

THE MAP AT 117E HIGH STREET

I have found a suitable place to keep the map when it is folded up, and I also took a few pictures to showcase it…

DSCN7755

A close focus on Verney Junction, one of the old outposts of the Metropolitan.
A close focus on Verney Junction, one of the old outposts of the Metropolitan.
Focus on Brill, at 51 miles from central London the most distant point ever served by a London Underground line.
Focus on Brill, at 51 miles from central London the most distant point ever served by a London Underground line.
Showing the proximity of Brill and Oxford - and the reason Edward Watkin was willing to purchase the Duke of Buckingham's private railway.
Showing the proximity of Brill and Oxford – and the reason Edward Watkin was willing to purchase the Duke of Buckingham’s private railway.