This gif exposes the lies the London Tube map is telling you

On the Beck Map and distortion…

The design by Harry Beck, which has stood the test of time, was first introduced in 1933. It’s success has been attributed to the ease with which it can be read, despite the lack of a consistent scale. The sprawl of the London Underground out into the suburbs means that if you were to use one scale that took in every stop, the sections showing central London would be completely unreadable. The coherence of the design has seen it exported to metro systems around the world.

Source: This gif exposes the lies the London Tube map is telling you

This is officially the best tube line

A survey reveals which London Underground line is rated best…

YouGov has asked London’s Tube riders what they think of the capital’s nerve system. Coming out on top is the east-west running Jubilee line. 1651 adults in London, were asked ‘Generally speaking do you like or dislike each of the following lines?’. They then chose from the options: generally like generally dislike neither like nor dislike don’t know not applicable From these scores, a net ranking was made for thirteen lines.

Source: This is officially the best tube line

An American writer took the Tube for the first time and fell in love

Here is an American view of London Underground, courtesy of http://www.independent.co.uk…

Dennis Green likes the London Underground. He really, really likes it. He likes it so much he wrote an article about how London is a “transportation paradise” compared to his current home of New York.

Source: An American writer took the Tube for the first time and fell in love

The Buckinghamshire Railway Centre

INTRODUCTION

This post came about because I was given a horse brass that relates to this establishment. I will explain in the course of the post my justification for including it on a site devoted to London Underground. 

THE BUCKINGHAMSHIRE RAILWAY CENTRE

It was only natural that I should check further for details of the Buckinghamshire Railway Centre. I discovered that it is based in Aylesbury and that it looks like an excellent museum. Click on the picture below to visit their website:

JUSTIFYING THIS INCLUSION

So what is this attraction doing on this site? There are two linked justifications for its inclusion. In my post about the Metropolitan line I have referred to the fact that that line once extended a lot further than it now does. Even after the sections beyond Aylesbury were closed, Metropolitan line trains continued to serve Aylesbury until the 1960s. In my post about the Central line I went in to detail about my vision of a London Orbital Railway. 

 

The Metropolitan line in its glory days.

 

In my vision the Metropolitan line would be pared back to the Uxbridge branch and the Chesham branch, the latter extended to Tring, with the Watford branch being wholly incorporated into the Orbital Railway, and the Amersham branch forming the start of a northwestern spur from the Orbital Railway which would extend to the old terminus at Brill, and thence to Oxford to link up with mainline railways there. There would possibly also be scope for reviving the old Verney Junction branch and extending to Milton Keynes, although with the Watford link this is very much an additional option rather than a central part of the vision.

As part of the Oxford spur there could be a station specifically for the Buckinghamshire Railway Centre, with tickets to that station including admission to the railway centre – after all how better to arrive at a railway centre than by train arriving at a station that is structurally part of the centre? 

Here is a second picture of that horse brass:

‘Please offer me a seat’ badges launched on London transport network | DisabledGo News and Blog

A new badge specially designed to make travelling easier for people who find it difficult to stand has been officially launched by Transport for London today. The blue ‘Please Offer Me a Seat’ badge is available to disabled passengers and those with hidden conditions, illnesses and injuries, to help them find a seat on public transport. The badge, and accompanying card have been created following requests from customers who can struggle to get a seat as their need is not immediately obvious. A six week trial with 1,200 people was held in autumn last year to test the new badge and card. More than 72 per cent of journeys were found to be easier as a result of the badge, and 98 per cent of people taking part in the trial said they would recommend it to somebody who needed it. The free badge and card is now available through the TfL website – http://www.tfl.gov.uk/accessibility The Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, said: “These blue badges will make a real difference to passengers who need a seat but just haven’t felt

Source: ‘Please offer me a seat’ badges launched on London transport network | DisabledGo News and Blog

A London Underground worker has been sacked for helping a pregnant colleague who was being assaulted | EvolvePolitics.com

This story from EvolvePolitics is distressing in multiple ways – the initial situation, the absolute refusal of London Underground bosses in the face of all evidence to the contrary to consider the possibility that they might have got things wrong, and the fact they have twice in this one case sided against their own staff and with a misbehaving passenger. So much for their much trumpeted “zero tolerance for violence towards our staff” line…

Bosses at London underground have upheld the sacking of a tube worker for defending a pregnant colleague who was pushed in the stomach by a fare-dodger.

Source: A London Underground worker has been sacked for helping a pregnant colleague who was being assaulted | EvolvePolitics.com

Greenwich

INTRODUCTION

The inspiration for this post came from a post on estersblog, which I link to by way of one of her splendid pictures at the end of this introduction. I will briefly mention by name all the stations that are within walking distance of Greenwich proper (North Greenwich, in spite of the second part of it’s name does not count), then I will provide links to some of the main sites that Greenwich has to offer, and I will conclude by describing a hypothetical day trip from King’s Lynn, where I now live to Greenwich.

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THE STATIONS

When the Docklands Light Railway first opened its southern terminus was Island Gardens, thought it has subsequently been extended south, via a new station at Cutty Sark to Lewisham. In addition to Island Gardens and Cutty Sark there are two mainline railway stations which are within walking distance of these attractions, Greenwich and Maze Hill. Having paid lip service to all four stations, and acknowledging the value of Cutty Sark station for those whose mobility is restricted, I serve notice that only two of these stations will receive further mention.

THE ATTRACTIONS

The whole area deserves to be explored properly, but here are four places particularly worthy of mention:

  1. The Cutty Sark – how many ships get to have a station named in their honour? This tea clipper well repays a visit and is a good starting point. For more about this attraction click on the image below to visit the official website.
    Cutty Sark
  2. The Gipsy Moth pub. Right by the Cutty Sark is a high quality pub where you can take refreshment before heading off to the other attractions. Click the picture below to find out more at their website:
    Pub in Greenwich
  3. The National Maritime Museum – set in a lovely area of parkland that also includes my final attraction, this museum has added many new exhibits since my last visit. Click on the image below to visit their website:
    A detail from 'Emma Hart as Circe' by George Romney ©Tate, London 2016
  4. Last but by no means least of the Greenwich fab four is the Royal Observatory which also now houses the London Planetarium (and if the latter is as good as it was in its Baker Street days you are in for a real treat). Click on the image below, which I took as part of my paid employment while imaging an old album that will be going under the hammer in James and Sons’ April auction, to visit the website:

A HYPOTHETICAL DAY TRIP FROM
KING’S LYNN TO GREENWICH

While there is little to be done about the King’s Lynn to London and back element of the journey except hope that there are not too many disruptions, there are lots of public transport options for getting to and from Greenwich, and this section of the post gives a route with a couple of variations that involves no going back the way we came. 

Alighting at King’s Cross, I would head down to the Northern line platforms and get a southbound train to Bank, where I would change to the Docklands Light Railway and travel to Island Gardens (not Cutty Sark), from where I would start the pedestrian section of my journey. Alighting at Island Gardens, no longer satisfactory as in the days of the original elevated terminus, I would pass under the Thames, by way of the Greenwich Foot Tunnel to arrive at my first attraction, the Cutty Sark.

Once I had finished looking round the Cutty Sark I would head to the nearby Gipsy Moth pub for a pint of something decent before heading to the National Maritime Museum and the Royal Observatory in that order. If possible I would sample the Planetarium while there.

For the journey back to King’s Cross I would head to Greenwich railway station, take a train to London Bridge, where I would head for the Jubilee line and catch a train heading in the direction of Stanmore. There are three possibilities for completing the circuit to King’s Cross from here:

  1. The quickest option, but also the one I would be least likely to take, would be to change at Green Park to the Victoria line (the interchange is long and often unpleasantly crowded, as is the equally possible interchange to the Piccadilly line at this same station) and travel north to King’s Cross.
  2. The middle option, and the one that I would be likeliest to take, is to travel along the Jubilee line as far as Baker Street and then ascend the escalator to the Metropolitan/ Circle/ Hammersmith and City line platforms, travelling east from there to King’s Cross.
  3. If time allowed and I was feeling so inclined I might stay on the Jubilee line until Finchley Road and make the cross-platform interchange to the Metropolitan line there.

SOME MAPS

Here to end the post are some maps:

We start with a picture showing the Docklands Light Railway and it’s connections, as this line bulks large in the story of this post.
This picture shows the whole area featured in my hypothetical day trip.
A close up of the area of interest from a public transport point of view.
A close up photo of part an old A-Z map page.