The Museum of London

INTRODUCTION

In this post I will talking about a well known London attraction and giving some information about its transport connections.

THE MUSEUM

This museum contains artefacts from the whole of London’s history and has some stuff from longer ago than that. I visited this museum many times when I lived in London. I will mention three highlights, a window that looks out on to a section of the Roman walls, a cross section of a street from the surface downwards, showing where stuff of various ages is to be found and the Lord Mayor of London’s carriage, which is on display there except when it is out on parade. This latter gives me on opportunity to advertise publicly a London Transport themed poster which is lot 737 in James and Sons’ October auction (Wednesday 26th, The Maids Head Hotel, Norwich – starts at 10AM, so this item will go under the hammer at about 3PM, if you would like to bid online click here).

737

PUBLIC TRANSPORT CONNECTIONS
FOR THE MUSEUM OF LONON

This post will finish with a map showing where the museum is located. It is effectively in the centre of a triangle formed by Barbican (Metropolitan, Hammersmith & City, Circle), Moorgate (Northern,¬†Metropolitan, Hammersmith & City, Circle, mainline railways) and St Paul’s (Central). For those visiting from outside London, according to where you arrive my suggestions would be as follows:

  • Euston – choose between heading for the Northern line, Bank branch and travelling to Moorgate or crossing Euston Road to Euston Square station and getting an eastbound train to Barbican.
  • Marylebone – take the short walk to Baker Street and get and eastbound train to Barbican
  • Paddington – head for the Hammersmith and City line platforms, which are structurally part of the main station and get an eastbound train to Barbican (do not be tempted by the District and Circle line platforms, which are so far distant that they should not be classed as part of the same station).
  • If you arrive by coach: some inbound coaches to London call at Marble Arch, in which case you can take an eastbound Central line train to St Pauls, otherwise you will arrive at Victoria Coach Station, in which case…
  • Victoria – while you could travel round the Circle line it would be quicker to take the Victoria line to King’s Cross and change, either to get a Hammersmith & City/ Circle/ Metropolitan train to Barbican or a Northern line train to Moorgate.
  • Waterloo/Waterloo East/ Charing Cross: another two way choice – the Jubilee line to Baker Street and change to an eastbound train to Barbican or take the Waterloo & City to Bank and change to the Northern or Central lines for the journey to St Pauls or Moorgate respectively. Please note that given that the station there is on the wrong branch of the Northern and the Bakerloo lines you are indubitably better off walking across the Thames to Waterloo to begin your underground journey (although north along to the northern to Tottenham Court Road and changing to the Central line is a possibility).
  • London Bridge: Northern to Moorgate (a mere two stops, definitely not worth changing to the Central at Bank, especially given the labyrinthine layout of that station).
  • Fenchurch Street: get a Circle line train round to Moorgate (you do not save enough walking time for the extra stop to Barbican to be worth it).
  • Liverpool Street: you could simply walk from here, but a westbound Circle/Metropolitan/ Hammersmith & City line train to Moorgate is also a possible (the descent to the Central line is not worthwhile IMO).
  • Moorgate: you are already there, but there is a point of interest – the section of line from Finsbury Park to Moorgate has twice been part of London Underground, once administered as part of the Metropolitan line and once as part of the Northern line.

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