A Pack of Playing Cards

INTRODUCTION

It has been a while since I last posted on this site due it being Christmas. During the Christmas period itself I stayed with my parents and sundry other family members in East Rudham (from the 24th to the 28th to be exact, there being no public transport on the 25th and 26th – which I wholeheartedly agree with – and the 27th being a Sunday), and I chose to not to take my computer with me. Appropriately my return to action on this site has to do with a Christmas present.

AN UNEXPECTED GIFT

This present was unexpected in two ways – I had no idea that I would be getting it, and it came from someone who I had not expected to get me a present in any case. The purchaser of the present (my cousin Amanda) had not been going to get me anything until she saw this item. It was a set of playing cards in an aluminium box, and on the front of the box and also on the back of each individual card was an extract from the London Underground map! A wonderful choice of present.

The playing cards are a little indistinct in this picture.
The playing cards are a little indistinct in this picture.
So i also took this one focussing specifically on the cards.
So i also took this one focussing specifically on the cards.
This picture has been further adapted to include the name of the station that is there but not named.
This picture has been further adapted to include the name of the station that is there but not named.

AN UNUSUAL FEATURE FOR AN ENGLISH PACK OF CARDS

Aside from the pattern, and the box in which they come there is one other unusual feature about this pack as compared to a standard English pack – the first picture below is the ace of spades from this pack, while the second is the same card from a pack of Waddington’s no 1s…

An unadorned ace of spades.
An unadorned ace of spades.
The traditional English ace of spades - the reason for this fancy card is that back in the day playing cards were heavily taxed, and manufacturers were only allowed to make 51 of the playing cards, receiving the ace of spades to complete the deck once they had paid the tax.
The traditional English ace of spades – the reason for this fancy card is that back in the day playing cards were heavily taxed, and manufacturers were only allowed to make 51 of the playing cards, receiving the ace of spades to complete the deck once they had paid the tax.

 

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